21st Century Assessment

Health Education, Grade 7, “Personal Food Choices” 

Assignment Description: Due Date: TBD

In this unit you will be exploring personal food choices while learning about nutrition. You will complete a series of activities as listed below. 

  1. Tracking Personal Food Consumption: 
    1. Over the course of 7 days, record your daily food intake. During this process, record every food and drink consumed. This can be done using a journal/notebook, phone, laptop, etc. See example below.
  1. Determine how and where to access healthy eating information.
    1. Where are you getting your food information from? How do you know if it is reliable? Is it easily accessible?
    2. Explore and collect online resources that discuss healthy eating and/or nutritional values. Create an “Online Resource” such as a Google Slide Presentation to share among the class.
  1. Examine the consequences of/of not evaluating information about healthy eating.
    1. Why are there nutrition labels on food? Who benefits from nutrition labels?
    2. Explore positive and negative consequences of not paying attention to important food information.
  1. Apply guidelines for healthy eating as presented in Canada’s Food Guide
    1. Use Canada’s Food Guide to outline the guidelines for a healthy diet and healthy eating habits.  What do you notice about the diet? What is included? What is missing?
  1. Analyze food labels for personal food choices for sodium, sugar, fat, and calorie content among similar products. 
    1. What do food labels tell us? Explain how you learned about food labels and how to use them for making healthy choices with food. 
  1. Prepare a three-day family food menu by applying nutritional knowledge to make nutritious selections (based on Canada’s Food Guide) using a variety of given family food budgets and/or situations.
    1. Explore menu planning for both small and large families with small and large budgets.

In groups of two, research personal food choices by following the guidelines below. One of you is the interviewer while the other is the interviewee. Record your interview for CTV News at 6 and upload to YouTube.

Use the following resources to collect information for your interview:

Formative assessment tool:

Once per day, once a week (therefore one meeting per week per student group of 2-3), the teacher meets with a different student group (approximately 5-10 minutes) for a one on one discussion in order to monitor progress, ask questions, follow up, gain insight, explore together, give direction, provide support, or research additional information together, and review their food diaries (as seen below).

Summative assessment tool (rubric):

Student Group Members Names:

_____________________________
_____________________________
_____________________________

Date: ____________________

CategoryBeginning(1)Progressing (2)Meeting (3)Exceeding (4)
Connection to how and where to access healthy eating information. USC 7.5 a.Has not demonstrated how/ where to access healthy eating information. Hardly demonstrated how/where to access healthy eating information.Made several references of how/ where to access healthy eating information.Consistently and independently referenced where to access healthy eating information.
Connection to examining the consequences of/of not evaluating information about healthy eating. USC 7.5 c.Has not demonstrated the consequences of not evaluating information about healthy eating.Hardly examined the consequences of/of not evaluating information about healthy eating.Made several references examining the consequences of/of not evaluating information about healthy eating.Consistently and independently examined the consequences of/of not evaluating information about healthy eating.
Connection to how to apply guidelines for healthy eating as presented in Canada’s Food Guide. USC 7.5 e.Has not demonstrated how to apply guidelines for healthy eating as presented in Canada’s Food Guide.Hardly applied guidelines for healthy eating as presented in Canada’s Food Guide.Made several references on appling guidelines for healthy eating as presented in Canada’s Food Guide.Consistently and independently made references on appling guidelines for healthy eating as presented in Canada’s Food Guide.
Connection to tracking and analyzing personal food consumption for one week (based on Canada’s Food Guide). USC 7.5 f.Did not track and analyze personal food consumption for one week (based on Canada’s Food Guide). Attempt to track and analyze personal food consumption for one week (based on Canada’s Food Guide) displayed poor performance; missing information/ gaps.Attempt to track and analyze personal food consumption for one week (based on Canada’s Food Guide) displayed concerted effort; no missing information.Attempt to track and analyze personal food consumption for one week (based on Canada’s Food Guide) exceeded expectations. Detailed documentation. Co
Connection to analyzing food labels for personal food choices for sodium, sugar, fat, and calorie content among similar products. USC 7.5 gNo attempt to analyze food labels for personal food choices for sodium, sugar, fat, and calorie content among similar products.Occasionally analyzed food labels for personal food choices for sodium, sugar, fat, and calorie content among similar products.Frequently analyzed food labels for personal food choices for sodium, sugar, fat, and calorie content among similar products.Consistently and independently analyzed food labels for personal food choices for sodium, sugar, fat, and calorie content among similar products.
Connection to preparing a three-day family food menu by applying nutritional knowledge to make nutritious selections (based on Canada’s Food Guide) using a variety of given family food budgets and/or situations. USC 7.5 h.No attempt was made to prepare a three-day family food menu by applying nutritional knowledge to make nutritious selections (based on Canada’s Food Guide).Attempted to prepare a family food menu by applying nutritional knowledge to make nutritious selections (based on Canada’s Food Guide) but using a variety of given family food budgets and/or situations was missing. Less than three-day meal plan.Prepared a three-day family food menu by applying nutritional knowledge to make nutritious selections (based on Canada’s Food Guide) using a variety of given family food budgets and/or situations.Exceeded a three-day family food menu by applying nutritional knowledge to make nutritious selections (based on Canada’s Food Guide) using a variety of given family food budgets and/or situations.
Select and use the appropriate strategies to communicate meaning before (e.g., planning and organizing ideas to fit format), during (e.g. using transition words), and after (e.g., revising to eliminate unnecessary repetition) speaking, writing, and other representing activities. CC7.3 b.No attempt for considerations displaying qualities of effective communication and the language to use (e.g., consider strong verbs to use and how to match stance/role/voice to audience purpose).Weak attempt of considerations displaying qualities of effective communication and the language to use (e.g., consider strong verbs to use and how to match stance/role/voice to audience purpose)Several considerations displaying qualities of effective communication and the language to use (e.g., consider strong verbs to use and how to match stance/role/voice to audience purpose).Very strong considerations displaying qualities of effective communication and the language to use (e.g., consider strong verbs to use and how to match stance/role/voice to audience purpose).

Total of 28 possible marks

Teacher’s notes: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________.

Peer assessment tool:

The purpose of this peer assessment is to help us practice critically analyzing peer work. Practicing this will help us become experts in group participation and fairness. You will receive 5 marks based on the depth and effort you exhibited. 

Name:
Participation (10)    10 marks         Yes  7 marks     Mostly   5 marks    Somewhat  2 marks      No
Participated in meaningful ways in the interview collaboration (as indicated by peers)   Group members were very flexible with planning, added their own creative influences, did well with problem solving and was able to collaborate effectively and efficiently.Group members showed flexibility with planning, added their own creative influences, did well with problem solving and was able to collaborate effectively and efficiently.Group members scarcely contributed, and were somewhat flexible. Needs improvements with organization and planning.  Little communication skills shownGroup members struggled to contribute to the creation.  Struggled with collaboration and flexibility.  

Self assessment tool: 

Student’s Name: ____________________________________________ Date:______________________

Areas for Improvement:OutcomesCriteria for Performance: Meets or Exceeds Expectations:
Did I determine how and where to access healthy eating information?
Did I examine the consequences of/of not evaluating information about healthy eating?
Did I apply guidelines for healthy eating as presented in Canada’s Food Guide?
Did I track and analyze personal food consumption for one week, based on Canada’s Food Guide?
Did I analyze food labels for personal food choices for sodium, sugar, fat, and calorie content among similar products?
Did I prepare a three-day family food menu by applying nutritional knowledge to make nutritious selections (based on Canada’s Food Guide) using a variety of given family food budgets and/or situations?
Proposed mark out of 10.                  /10

Our assignment, Personal Food Choices, aligns with 21st century competencies, multimodalities, and is authentic. This project-based group assignment allows students to be flexible, creative, problem solve, collaborate, requires interpersonal skills such as organizing, and offers a real-life scenario. Real world learning, such as this assignment, present excellent learning opportunities for students because they are able to “demonstrate a richer level of understanding and application of process and learning skills in a broader context than traditional testing would allow” (Luongo- Orlando, K. pg. 8).

21st century competencies mean student performance requires critical thinking, innovation, problem solving, communication, collaboration, and creativity. These are important competencies given the increasingly competitive global marketplace. These competencies are more than skills or knowledge, “[I]t involves the ability to meet complex demands” (Ontario, pg. 9). Our assignment, Personal Food Choices, meets the criteria for 21st century competencies because students use the teacher’s given framework to create a personalized presentation through a Q&A format, creating a YouTube video, while exploring and learning through their own research and data collection. The students are asked to collaborate with peers and research topics while they evaluate and make informed decisions to form a judgement “using a variety of tools and resources” (Ontario, pg. 12). They do this first by tracking and analyzing their food consumption for one week and then they are to determine how and where to access healthy eating information. Through a collaborative effort they examine and apply Canada’s Food Guide guidelines to make necessary adjustments to their food consumption. Through group communication they discuss and document the consequences of/ of not evaluating information about healthy eating. Then in a creative way, the student group’s create a script (interview/ interviewee format) and YouTube video discussing nutrition and personal eating choices that can include handouts (such as pamphlets) for community nutritionists/ dieticians. This process requires teamwork, perseverance, and organization and “employers are increasingly valuing “soft” skills” (Ontario, pg. 10). The group may discover multiple solutions to making adjustments to their food consumption and this can lead to creative solutions with no known answer. This is what 21st century competency learning is all about!

Multimodalities mean the inclusion of being flexible, multi-skilled, undertaking a range of tasks, using new technologies, and the ability to apply knowledge in different and new contexts. Life now is a “life of change and diversity” (Kalantzis, Cope, & Harvey, pg. 19) therefore the old way of passively learning off by heart is no longer applicable. Personal Food Choices supports students using technology to research food choices, how and where to access healthy eating information, consequences of healthy eating, and to track their food intake. Furthermore, they are required to use technology to create a Q&A YouTube video using any program such as PowerPoint, Google Slides, Prezi, Zoom, iMovie, etc. As students research and acquire more knowledge in their project they will be learning how to be flexible and multi-skilled in order to apply their new found information applicable to their life. “Students are more engaged, intrinsically motivated to learn, and more successful when they can connect what they are learning to situations they care about” (Ontario, pg. 34). Deeper and more meaningful learning will occur.

Authenticity means real world learning is incorporated using real-life situations; the final product can include a portfolio, exhibition, performance, an experiment, presentation, YouTube video, and so forth. The Personal Food Choices project immerses students into their real-life eating habits where they monitor, apply food guidelines, and then examine consequences. Our project is also authentic because the students are to produce a three-day menu using a variety of budgets and situations. Authentic learning shifts from ‘getting the grade’ to promoting “new learning and to measure more accurately the skills required for success in the twenty-first century” (Kalantzis, Cope, & Harvey, pg. 16). Successful learners embody planning and completing projects and group work while embracing real-world scenarios all the while building a portfolio.

In conclusion, the group project we’ve assigned the grade 7 health class incorporates 21st century competencies, multimodalities, and is authentic. We believe this assignment is engaging, allows for creativity, flexibility, and meets curriculum outcomes and indicators. As teacher’s, we are open to student ideas if they would like to take the project in a slightly different direction, and to be multi-modal and authentic, we hope this occurs. Personal Food Choices will aid students in deeper learning by developing many desirable (and hirable) 21st century competencies. 

References

Kalantzis, M. (2010). Assessing MULTILITERACIES and the NEW BASICS.PDF. Retrieved April 15, 2021.

Ontario, 21St century competencies: Foundation document for discussion. (2016). Retrieved April 15, 2021.

Luongo-Orlando, K. (2003). Luongo-Orlando.pdf. Retrieved April 15, 2021.

MacKenzie Art Gallery, post visit lesson 2

Class: Grade 6                                                                        
Topic: Identity
Subject: Arts Ed.

Post-lesson 2 after to students visit MacKenzie Art Gallery 
Content: In response to the art of Semchuk and Nicholas, students respond with their own piece of art while understanding that their own cultural background and experiences will affect their own art response. This lesson can easily span two to three additional lessons, especially to incorporate good discussion.
Outcomes and Indicators:
CR6.1 Create personal responses to a variety of arts expressions (e.g., respond to music using poetry, or respond to visual art using music). a. Demonstrate critical and creative thinking when responding to the work of Saskatchewan and other Canadian dance, drama, music, and visual artists (e.g., composers, graphic artists, architects, actors, filmmakers). b. Recognize that cultural background and experiences affect responses to arts expressions and the understanding of symbols and meanings. c. Discuss interpretations of arts expressions and create own expressions in response to the original work
Prerequisite Learning: Students need to come to class having researched any symbols and meanings with their own cultural background (ie: cross of Jesus Christ may be significant to some Christians, a national flag, a dreamcatcher, specific song, colour, or food, etc.). Parental help may have been necessary for these at home conversations.
Lesson Preparation Equipment/Materials Students choice of art medium’s supplies, as previously approved by teacher. Advanced Preparation Students have previously been asked to research any of their own cultural symbols. If these include any artifacts, the students may wish to bring them, or a picture of them.
Presentation
Set: (15 min) Ask for student volunteers to share a symbol and its meaning within their own cultural background. Teacher goes first if there is hesitancy. My example: Christmas songs have deep meaning to me because it reminds me of my European grandmother who loved to sing, especially Christmas songs. She died when I was 16. Allow sharing and discussion to help students understand that each of our different cultural backgrounds and experiences affect the responses to arts expressions as well as the understanding of symbols and meanings. A symbol to one (ie: food) may have significant meaning to one but not to another. This is great because it adds variety, diversity, and different perspectives to our lives, enhancing our world view. Thinking back to our visit to the Mackenzie Art Gallery a few weeks ago, think about the featured artists we learned about (Semchuk and Nicholas). How did their different cultural background (remembering Semchuk is Ukrainian Polish and her husband was Nisichawayasihk Cree) and experiences affect responses to their arts expressions? (teacher may need to give prompts: Semchuk’s photography or Nicholas’s poetry).

Development: (25 min) Students create their own expressions in response to the original work of Semchuk and Nicholas using the medium they previously discussed with the teacher the week prior. Choices may include but are not limited to: photography using their own cell phones, visual art, sculpture using modeling clay, literature (poetry, short story), etc. The art has to have been pre-approved.

Closure: (10 min) Students share their interpretations of the arts expressions they created in response to the original work.
 

Extensions: A student may have a special family member that can contribute to the discussion on how cultural background and experiences affect responses to arts expressions and the understanding of symbols and meanings. This family member could attend class to further deepen understanding.

Adaptive Dimension: Students may need more time to create their own expressions in response to the original work of Shemchuk and Nicholas.

The students may need to be reminded of the Mackenzie Art Gallery exhibition they saw as it has now been a few weeks since having been there.

MacKenzie Art Gallery, post visit lesson 1

Class: Grade 6                                                                    
Topic: Identity
Subject: Arts Ed.

Post-lesson 1 after to students visit MacKenzie Art Gallery 
Content: Students work in small groups discussing how cultural identity is reflected in the art work of James Nicholas and Sandra Semchuk. Discuss how Nicholas and Semchuk’s cultural traditions and art have influenced intercultural understanding. Students, in small groups, are encouraged to create cut poetry using James Nicholas’s poems as well as contemporary poets of countries bordering the Atlantic Ocean.
Outcomes and Indicators:
Arts Ed. CH6.2 Students will explore collaborative artworks between Cree artist James Nicholas and Ukrainian Canadian artist Sandra Semchuk that use portraiture, landscape photography, and poetry to explore ideas about contemporary cultural identity. Analyze and discuss how artists reflect cultural identity in their work. Make connections between traditional expressions of cultural identity (e.g., throat singing, quill work) and the ideas of contemporary artists.
Social Studies IN6.2 Examine the social and cultural diversity that exists in the world, as exemplified in Canada and a selection of countries bordering the Atlantic Ocean. b. Research ways in which cultural traditions, celebrations, art, music, literature, drama, and sport have influenced intercultural understanding.
Prerequisite Learning: None
Lesson Preparation Equipment/Materials Poster board (one per group), scissors, glue Advanced Preparation Photocopies of poetry by James Nicholas as well as contemporary poets of countries bordering the Atlantic Ocean.
Presentation
Set: (10 min) How did Sandra Semchuk and James Nicholas reflect their cultural identity in their work that we saw at the Mackenzie Art Gallery last week? Allow time for reflection, discussion and questions.
How did Sandra Semchuk and her husband James Nicholas’s art influence each other to achieve intercultural understanding? (remember Semchuk was Ukrainian/ Polish and Nicholas was Nisichawayasihk Cree).

Development: (30 min) Divide students into 3-4 groups. Hand out paper copies of poetry by James Nicholas as well as contemporary poets of countries bordering the Atlantic Ocean, one of each to each group. Encourage group members to look for traditional expressions James Nicholas and Sandra Semchuk employed to tap into their own cultural identity (Nisichawayasihk Cree and Ukrainian/ Polish). What connections of cultural identity can you identify in contemporary artists (of countries bordering the Atlantic Ocean)? Research ways in which cultural traditions, celebrations, art, music, literature, drama, and sport have influenced intercultural understanding. Students can use the provided poetry for a jumping off point if needed Groups are then encouraged to work together to create their own poetry by cutting words/ phrases from the given poetry.

Closure: (10min) Students may choose to read their cut poetry to each other. Allow for discussion and questions.
 

Extensions: Students may want to write their own poetry. This can be added to their personal portfolio or they can use it towards the group’s cut poetry. Students may wish to research poetry of poets from countries that border the Atlantic Ocean.

Adaptive Dimension: Students may want to explore with cultural traditions, art, or photography instead of poetry. Have them use the same questions in the development section using Semchuk’s and Nicholas’s other art mediums and those of countries bordering the Atlantic Ocean.

MacKenzie Art Gallery, pre visit

Class: Grade 6                                                                        
Topic: Identity
Subject: Arts Ed.

Pre-lesson prior to students visiting MacKenzie Art Gallery 
Content: Students will collaborate and create a drama (with two short episodes) together with the theme and focus: “What if we were to discover that we had suddenly switched identities with other people or creatures?”, or another appropriate theme/ focus of their own.
Outcomes and Indicators:
Arts Ed. CP6.6 Collaborate on a drama that expresses ideas about identity and how it is influenced (e.g., factors such as pop culture, cultural heritage, peer groups, personal and family interests, gender). Use inquiry in drama to extend understanding about identity and how it is influenced: • Generate questions to guide inquiry in drama (e.g., What if we were to discover that we had suddenly switched identities with other people or creatures?). b. Contribute ideas to the topic, focus, and development of the drama. d. Recognize that dramas, and episodes within dramas, have focus; and help to identify and maintain that focus. j. Describe how the drama conveys ideas about identity, and how the drama might be refined.
ELA CR6.4 View, respond, and demonstrate comprehension of visual and multimedia grade-appropriate texts including traditional and contemporary texts from First Nations, Métis, and other cultures containing special features (e.g., the visual components of magazines, newspapers, websites, comic books, broadcast media, video, and advertising). View for a variety of purposes including to understand and gather information, to form an opinion, and to enjoy and appreciate.
Social Studies RW6.1 Examine and analyze factors that contribute to quality of life, including material and non-material factors. a. Explain the difference between needs and wants.
Prerequisite Learning: None
Lesson Preparation Equipment/Materials Students will each need a paper and a writing utensil (pen or pencil). Advanced Preparation 2 different rooms, or at least two different spaces, for the two groups to work separately from another.
Presentation
Set: (10 min) Discuss: “What if we were to discover that we had suddenly switched identities with other people or creatures?” How will this make you feel? How will this affect your identity? What contributes to your identity? Needs? Wants? Do material and non-material factors affect quality of life, therefore our identity? Would you want to take on someone/things else’s identity? Will you still be recognized for you? Will the “you” change if your body changes?

Development: (25 min) Number students off into two groups (1,2). Depending on the size of the class three groups may be more appropriate. Each group is to create a five-minute (maximum) drama which consists of two episodes. Once in groups, students collaborate for a topic or focus of their play with the given theme “What if we were to discover that we had suddenly switched identities with other people or creatures?”. Have students anonymously write down their thoughts for possible developments of the drama (this is to ensure every student contributes: some are too shy to vocally contribute). No idea is stupid; students are encouraged to use every idea presented (provided it is appropriate). The presented ideas can be broken into two segments to create the two required episodes or the presented ideas can all be used together, twice, creating the two different episodes. Encourage students to think of their daily needs and wants: how does this affect their quality of life and therefore their identity. Tie this into their drama. Teacher: teach students in their separate groups that for dramas to be effective, they need to have focus. Encourage students to find and stay with their focus. Students prepare their two short episodes for their classmates, staying within their focus.

Closure: (15 min) Groups take turns presenting their drama to the other. Follow the presentations with the questions: 1. How did the drama groups convey ideas about identity? 2. How might the drama be refined to better convey ideas about identity? Explain to the students that in their tour to the Mackenzie Art Gallery next week they are going to see examples of how the artists James Nicholas & Sandra Semchuk work through themes of their own identity using various art mediums.
 

Extensions: Students may wish to incorporate artifacts, simple costuming, lighting, and/ or sound into their drama.

Adaptive Dimension: Students may prefer smaller, more intimate groups to feel more comfortable. This can easily be accommodated.

Beethoven, Haydn, or Mozart

Class: Grade 8                                                 Date: TBD      

Topic: Social Issues                                         Subject: Music

Lesson Plan50 Minutes
Content: Students work collaboratively hotseating each other in character as either Beethoven, Haydn, or Mozart (one at a time). Students participate in both roles as hotseater and being hotseated. In the outer circle team, the group addresses Beethoven, Haydn, or Mozart with questions or problems and Beethoven, Haydn, or Mozart, in that character, take a few moments to confer with their team before responding.
Outcomes and Indicators:
CR8.3 Investigate and identify how arts expressions can reflect diverse worldviews Discuss and describe the meaning of worldview. Describe how diverse worldviews may be represented in the arts
Assessment: At the end of class take time to discuss as a group what went well and what answers they would change now that they have had time to think about it. The students may even choose a “rewind” (physically or metaphorically) to redo things. Teacher observes closely to assist students that may be too reserved to vocalize their thoughts- teacher may break students into smaller groups instead of having one large group in order to get all students participation.
Prerequisite Learning: Information regarding Beethoven, Haydn, Mozart’s personal and professional lives (as learned from the previous 3 music lessons).
Lesson Preparation Equipment/Materials Reader’s Theatre from lesson #1, soliloquy from lesson #2, drama play from lesson #3 (to review with students if necessary) Advanced Preparation None
Presentation
Set: (5 min) What does “worldview” mean? (A collection of beliefs about life and the universe held by an individual or a group.) Discuss different worldviews and remind students we have just studied 3 different music composers (Beethoven, Haydn, Mozart) who all have different worldviews even though they worked in the same industry.

Development: (35 in) Form 2 circles. Those on the inside are in the hotseat and can confer about their response as if they were one person. Students in the outer circle play other roles, conversing, then posing questions and problems to those in the inner circle. Both inner and outer students speak one at a time, after conferring with others in their group about what their questions and responses will be. Hotseat characters are the composers we’ve been studying about: Beethoven, Haydn, Mozart. Hotseat each composer one at a time. The outer and inner circles switch so all students have the opportunity to hotseat and to be hotseated.

Closure: (10 min) Discussion: What are some different responses you would have given in this activity now that you’ve had time to think about it? How are diverse worldviews represented in the arts?
Classroom Management Strategies          
Number students 1-2 to create 2 groups.   Students may be confused and not remember what each composer’s life looked like; possibly review. When hot seating: allow for way more time. Some students take it and some do not; still try again.

Extensions:

  1. The outer circle can be a former or future composer of himself, not necessarily tied to the Era they lived.
  2. A “devil” character on the inner circle can attempt to negatively influence Beethoven, Haydn, or Mozart’s character’s responses. Or an angel can do the opposite.

Adaptive Dimension:

  1. The hotseat activity can be broken into smaller groups of 4-5 students. This does not require the students to stand in a circle around each other; they can simply have the Beethoven, Haydn, or Mozart character take a seat in front of the smaller group and the remaining 3-4 students pose questions/ problems.

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Class: Grade 8                                                 Date: TBD      

Topic: Social Issues                                         Subject: Music (crossed with Phys.Ed.)

Lesson Plan50 Minutes
Content: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is introduced to the students along with one of his famous compositions entitled Eine Kleine Nachtmusik. Students listen to and respond to Eine Kleine Nachtmusik by acting out various people and events that took place in Mozart’s life. A movement/ dance activity is then introduced to help the students become comfortable saying Eine Kleine Nachtmusik. This lesson can easily extend over two classes to further supplement student learning.
Outcomes and Indicators:
(Arts Ed) CR8.1 Respond to professional dance, drama, music, and visual art works through the creation of own arts expressions. b. Analyze and discuss how dance, drama, music, visual and interdisciplinary arts are expressions of individual or collective perspectives d. Create own work (e.g., visual or performing arts) in response to a professional arts expression, and describe how own work is inspired or influenced by the original work.

(Physical Ed) 8.7 Decision Making Analyze the situational decisions, of self and others, while under the pressure of game play in target games, net/wall games, striking/fielding games, invasion/territorial games, and low-organizational, inventive, and cooperative games to determine the effectiveness of the decisions and to propose options for improvement. d. Express insights into personal tactical and strategic choices used in game situations to judge the effectiveness of the choices and to propose options to enhance future choices. e. Express insights in response to questions such as “Can a criticism ever be a positive thing?” and “What does ‘good enough’ mean when it comes to participation in movement games?”
Assessment: Students write down two things they liked/ noticed about the YouTube video presented to them at the beginning of class. Do no hand in yet because at the end of class the students add to their comments but this time responding to the question: How are arts expressions of individual or collective perspectives?
Prerequisite Learning: None
Lesson Preparation Equipment/Materials Advanced Preparation
Presentation
Set: (5 min) What stands out to you when you watch (only play 2 minutes; it’s 24 minutes long) this? What do you like/ dislike? Mozart composed this serenade for string instruments. But who is Mozart? Let’s discover more about him!

Development: (40 min) (20 min each activity) Divide class in half. Distribute prepared play outline (I sketched out, attached). Groups decide how to present this play, utilizing each group member. Even though there are only 7 speaking parts all group members can participate. Finish up with a discussion on how their own work is inspired or influenced by the original work, Eine Kleine Nachtmusik by Mozart that we heard at the beginning of class. Teacher may choose to replay this piece.   Keep students in their same groups but present to the whole class how to pronounce Eine Kleine Nachtmusik, which translates to A Little Night Music. (“Ine A Kline A Nacht Music”). Introduce the activity “Pass the Beat Around the Room” but using the words Eine Kleine Nachtmusik. The students stand in a circle in their groups. One student begins by stating ONE syllable only (“INE”) followed by the student to their right that states the next syllable (“A”), and so on. Finish with a rest. This will take a lot of practice. Keep the 8 syllables (7+ a rest) going around the circle. Many extensions can be added as the students are ready, see below.  

Closure: (5 min) Have students return to their original paper they wrote on when they responded to hearing Eine Kleine Nachtmusik at the beginning of class. The students add to this now by responding to this proposed question: How are arts (we explored music, drama, & possibly a little bit of dance in this lesson) expressions of individual or collective perspectives?
Classroom Management Strategies   Encourage students to write down their responses.   Students may not know what serenade means: a piece of music sung or played in the open air, typically by a man at night under the window of his lover. For fair group division: number students off: 1-2. Not necessary the play be performed in front of all class members. At the end take time to discuss student insights into personal tactical and strategic choices used while developing and forming the play. Were the choices effective? What could you do to improve your performance? This game is traditionally played where when a student messes up, they are out. Please do not play it this way- do not exclude a student. Carry on with the activity after a mistake without a student going “out”. The point is not to find a winner but to gain understanding of Mozart and one of his famous compositions. Use the time when mistakes happen to discuss “Can a criticism ever be a positive thing?” and “What does ‘good enough’ mean when it comes to participation in movement games?” The class could possibly become noisy when it should be silent because students may not understand the closing question and become frustrated. Teacher be prepared to lead a brief discussion regarding how arts is an expression of individual perspectives. Encourage a written response after the discussion.

Extensions:

  1. If/ when students become very comfortable saying Eine Kleine Nachtmusik, staying with a steady pulse/ rhythm then one syllable can become silent and body percussion can be substituted in. Example: “INE” becomes a clap, “A” becomes a thigh slap, etc. Be very careful not to add too many too quickly.
  2. Shake up the order of the circle so students do not become so familiar with “their’ syllable.
  1. Adaptive Dimension:
  1. Students could write a response to one group’s play performance instead of both groups performing.
  2. Students could choose to write a play with the provided information rather than improv.

Play to Act Out:

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: child prodigy: harpsichordist, pianist, organist, violinist, composer. Age 6 he plays for Empress Maria Theresa; meets Johan Christian Bach. Composed first opera at age 12. Age 13 he is appointed the concertmaster at the court where his dad worked; unpaid for 2 years when a new archbishop is appointed. He gets fired but is eventually reinstated.

Mozart’s father, Leopold Mozart: highly esteemed violist, court musician, composer, author, taught his son. Planned extensive tours around Europe to showcase his son’s abilities.

Mozart’s sister, Maria Anna: also a gifted musician.

Mozart’s mother: died while on tour with Mozart in Paris.

Mozart’s wife, Constanze Weber: Had 2 talented sisters. She was an opera singer. 4 of their 6 children do not survive. Leopold does not want his son Mozart to marry Constanze. Both Mozart and Constanze live beyond their means and are careless with their money causing financial hardships. She remarries after Mozart’s death and enjoys a long a comfortable life benefiting from Mozart’s growing fame.

Narrator 1: Mozart spends time in Italy, Salzburg, and Vienna and enjoys prosperity (although he was terrible with his money) as a pianist, teacher, and composer. Died December 5, 1791 (age 35), inexpensive funeral, unmarked grave.

Narrator 2: Mozart exemplified elegance, balance, poise, refinement, and sophistication. Opera was central to his career. He created compelling, realistic characters dramatically and musically.

Franz Joseph Haydn

Class: Grade 8                                                 Date: TBD      

Topic: Social Issues                                         Subject: Music (crossed with Eng. Lang. Arts)

Lesson Plan50 Minutes
Content: Students learn about the life of Franz Joseph Haydn and his string quartet composition called the Emperor Quartet. A brief history of how this composition came to be along with a discussion on why this is important to us today and how it applies to us. Students cut the lyrics from this anthem to create “cut poetry” to represent their chosen social issue.
Outcomes and Indicators:
(Arts Ed) CH8.1 Research and share insights about arts expressions that incorporate social commentary. Research independently, using the Internet and other sources, the work of visual and performing artists who address social issues. Analyze and comment on the effectiveness of using the arts as a vehicle for social change.
(ELA) CR8.1 View, listen to, read, comprehend, and respond to a variety of texts that address identity (e.g., Becoming Myself), social responsibility (e.g., In Search of Justice), and efficacy (e.g., Building a Better World). View, listen to, read, and respond to a variety of visual, multimedia (including digital), oral, and print texts that address the grade-level themes and issues related to identity, social responsibility, and efficacy including those that reflect diverse personal identities, worldviews, and backgrounds (e.g., appearance, culture, socio-economic status, ability, age, gender, sexual orientation, language, career pathway).
Assessment: Cut poetry is handed in at the end of class with 2 sentences explaining/ commenting on their poem: what it means to them and how it applies/ represents their social cause.
Prerequisite Learning: Students need to know and understand what social issues are and be able to choose one as their “cause”. Social issues can be anything such as: Poverty, Homelessness, Climate change, Overpopulation, Immigration, Animal rights, Eating disorders, suicide, pollution, etc. Students need an understanding of what these terms mean; if they do not the teacher needs to be prepared to briefly cover what they mean or have handouts with a paragraph explaining.
Lesson Preparation Equipment/Materials Computer, Audio, Internet, YouTube (first 2 minutes). Picture of Esterhazy house in Vienna. Copy of lyrics to Emperor Quartet for each student. Cardstock, scissors, glue, pencils, pens, markers. Short story (local news article, picture book, etc) about a youth being socially engaged in their community. Advanced Preparation Photocopied lyrics to Emperor Quartet (included) for each student. Find a recent news article regarding a youth being socially engaged or bring the book Build a Better World. Find an appropriate pop song that can be played in class (no cursing or reference to drugs, alcohol, sex, etc.).
Presentation
Set: (6 min) Have students listen to “Emperor Quartet” by Haydn, first few minutes. Why learn about composers who lived over 200 years ago? Listen to an appropriate pop song; Ex: something by Taylor Swift, Harry Styles, Ed Sheeran, etc. Most of western music (including pop, western, rock, hip-hop, etc) is built off music systems, rules, developments, etc of European composers.

Development: (34 min) Invite students to research the work of visual & performing artists that address a social issue.   One student reads soliloquy (included, I wrote). Hand out lyrics for Emperor Quartet and listen to the first few minutes of the piece again encouraging students to follow along. Discuss (answers found within the soliloquy) why Haydn composed this piece of music. What inspired him? Who/ what did he compose for? What was the purpose of his composition? What was his social issue? How did Haydn use his art for social change? How can art be an effective vehicle for social change? What can you do to promote social change? Students cut the prepared lyrics and create their own poem to represent their social issue. The cut words can appear in any order the students choose. New words can be added; encourage students to use at least some of the lyrics provided. Encourage a nice visual representation. On the back of their cut poetry the student writes two sentences explaining/ commenting on their poem: what it means to them.

Closure: (10 min) Students can share their cut poetry. Cut poetry is handed in for assessment.
Classroom Management Strategies The research section of this lesson is meant to be brief, not to monopolize the entire lesson. Look for a student volunteer with strong reading skills. Help with the big word Kapellmeister.   Students may be discouraged because they don’t understand words in the given poem. Emperor: king or ruler Bliss: great joy Laurel branches: green glossy shrub/ plant leaves Wreath: an arrangement of flowers                 Students do not have to share their cut poetry vocally in front of the class but are encouraged to.

Extensions:

  1. Students may enjoy writing a full poem/ lyrics to accompany Haydn’s composition, replacing the lyrics Haydn used (written by poet Lorenz Leopold Haschka) that represent their social cause.
  2. Research the meaning behind England’s national anthem God Save the Queen.
  3. The student can further research their social issue and hypothesise how change can occur.

Adaptive Dimension:

  1. Students can read the soliloquy at their own pace and then respond using cut poetry.
  2. Perhaps the students do not understand what social issues are: be prepared to discuss or have handouts to cover these topics.

Soliloquy:

My name is Franz Joseph Haydn (pronounced HIGH-Den), known as “Papa” Haydn. I worked most of my career for the same wealthy Esterhazy family. {Show their home in Vienna.

I only had one teacher and in 1759 I began my first full time position as Kapellmeister to count Ferdinand von Morzin where I conducted, composed, and performed. I married Maria Anna Keller and 7 years later we moved with the wealthy Esterhazy family to their estate. I had a very strict dress code but they gave me freedom to discover my artistic voice and creative freedom. In the 1790’s I made 2 financially successful trips to London, England (a 15.5-hour drive nowadays!). While in England I grew to admire the national anthem, God Save the Queen. In 1796 (224 years ago!), I was so inspired by England’s national anthem that I wrote my own moving national anthem inspired by God Save the Queen. I wrote this for my native country Austria, in honour of its emperor, Francis 2 and it became known as the Emperor Quartet.

Lyrics: by poet Lorenz Leopold Haschka

God save Francis the Emperor, our good Emperor Francis!

Long live Francis the Emperor in the brightest splendor of bliss!

May laurel branches bloom for him, wherever he goes, as a wreath of honour.

God save Francis the Emperor, our good Emperor Francis!

Ludwig van Beethoven

Class: Grade 8                                                 Date: TBD

Topic: Social Issues                                         Subject: Music

Lesson Plan50 Minutes 
Content: Learn about Ludwig van Beethoven’s life (he was a real person!) by having students read the prepared readers theatre (attached). Students use Beethoven’s motif from his 5th Symphony as inspiration for their own improvisation using an online beat & sequence maker as well as using their Indigenous flutes. This lesson can easily extend over two classes to further explore student improvisation.
Outcomes and Indicators: 
(Arts Ed) CP8.7 Improvise, compose, and perform (e.g., with voice, instruments, and technologies) a selection of pieces in contrasting styles. b. Improvise simple pieces around a given structure. c. Create and improvise with an instrument paying attention to sound quality and intonation. d. Investigate ways that silence can be used in improvisation and music composition. f. Create composed and improvised melodic and rhythmic ostinati to accompany singing and playing. g. Use the Internet and other sources to research and discuss composers who work in contrasting styles. ***EXTENSION*** h. Prepare, rehearse, present, and evaluate individual and group performances of contrasting styles of music.
Assessment: Teacher walks around the classroom the entire time observing and assisting students creating their simple pieces around the given structure of Beethoven’s 5th symphony motif (da da da dahhhhhhh). Listen/ watch the students created music grid beats and offer praise and suggestions on how to include silence as well as rhythmic changes (music grid accommodates different pitches and speeds- encourage students to explore these).
Prerequisite Learning:  Students need to know the basics of how to play the Indigenous flute (similar to the recorder; taught in earlier grades). Students may benefit from being familiar with Music Grid, free online software.
Lesson Preparation Equipment/Materials Computer, Audio, Internet, YouTube (first 2 minutes)11 copies of the reader’s theatre & name tags. Music Grid website. Laptops/ tablets for students. Whiteboard/ chalk board/ whiteboard markers/ chalk/ eraser Advanced Preparation Photocopy the reader’s theatre Teacher is comfortable using Music Grid. Name tags identifying characters in the readers theatre
Presentation
Set: (4 min) Show first two minutes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fOk8Tm815lE  Who has heard this piece of music? What does it remind you of? Who wrote this piece of music? His name is Ludwig van Beethoven and today we are going to learn a little bit about him.  
Development: (36 min)  Using 11 volunteers, have students take one part each and read the attached reader’s theatre (I created). Beethoven used one main theme, a motif, through this 5th Symphony. This theme keeps recurring throughout. It looks like this: GGGEflat, FFFD (draw on board). What does it sound like? (da da da dahhhhhhhhh). Have students listen to Beethoven’s 5th Symphony one more time (the first 18 seconds). Now it is our turn! Using Beethoven’s motif (dadada dahhhhhhhhh) see how you can play/ improvise with it on Music Grid. IF TIME ALLOTS: (this lesson may need to be split in half because they may enjoy using Music Grid so much). Now get out your Indigenous flutes and improvise using the given motif from Beethoven. Encourage students to incorporate silence (musical term= rests) into their compositions. How do rests change the rhythm? In pairs or very small groups: challenge some students to play the given motif (their created one or Beethoven’s) while the other plays an accompaniment (possibly one note sustained, ostinati). Practice for an informal in class “recital.”  

Closure: (10 min) Class recital time. 2 Minute journal writing time: what did the students notice when you incorporated silence (rests) into your composition? How did the composition change? Or did the composition change?    
Classroom Management Strategies    
Reader’s Theatre participants may come to the front of the classroom to read; obtain name tag.     Depending on time, class size, student behaviour, accessibility to laptops/ tablets: students can work on Music Grid alone or with partners. Teacher walks around room giving positive feedback, praise, and suggestions in using Music Grid. Engage with students in creative process. Remind students: The Indigenous flute is an instrument that gets treated with respect and care; it is not to be blown through causing earing piercing sounds. We are seeking good intonation. Teacher give signal/ cue once instruments can be played/ touched; students do not randomly pick up and play with- there are neighbouring classrooms! Students do not have to perform in the in-class recital but it is strongly encouraged. A neighbouring classroom may enjoy watching the recital.

Extensions:

  1. Have students research Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (same era) to compare different musical ideas and styles.
  2. Have students look on a map for Bonn, Germany, where Beethoven was born. What else was going on at this time (1770-1827, politically, religiously, etc.)?

Adaptive Dimension:

  1. Instead of reading through the reader’s theatre I can give a brief history of Beethoven’s life.
  2. Perhaps some students do not know how to use/ play the Indigenous flute: I can give instructions (it is actually very simple, especially for a grade 8 student to learn).
  3. For students that perhaps cannot use their mouths to blow into the indigenous flute, the student can blow using their nostrils or they can spend extra time with Music Grid.
  4. For students who have sensory needs: they may choose to work in the hallway or another classroom (make sure they do not interpret this as “punishment”); have the students use their earphones for Music Grid.

 Reader’s Theatre:       

Ludwig Beethoven (Grandpa)Hello! My name is Ludwig and I am the Kapellmeister at Electoral court in Bonn, Germany. My grandson is Ludwig van Beethoven but I died when he was 3 years old.
Johann BeethovenI have three sons; Ludwig van, Kaspar, and Nikolaus. I am a singer and instrumentalist at the Electoral court and I gave Ludwig his early musical training.
NarratorJohann was a harsh, severe parent and became an alcoholic.
Ludwig van BeethovenI am an organist and violinist. I traveled to Vienna to study with Mozart.
MotherI am Ludwig’s mother but I fell ill requiring my son Ludwig to return home early from Vienna to care for his brothers. I died soon after his return and Ludwig van become financially responsible for his brothers.
Ludwig van BeethovenI finally get to move to Vienna where I studied with Haydn. I get established- I am well known for my ability to improvise.
Prince LichnowskyI am a prince whom pays Ludwig van Beethoven but I quickly realize he has a ferocious temper where he storms off frequently. He moves 33 times in 35 years because he cannot get along with his landlords (& he was apparently a terrible tenant).
NarratorLudwig van Beethoven has many romantic relationships but remains single. He begins to lose his hearing in his mid-twenties and all treatments fail.
Ludwig van BeethovenI am deeply troubled and going through a lot of inner turmoil. In 1802 I write a letter to my dear brother telling him of my struggles. I contemplate suicide.
KasparI am Ludwig van Beethoven’s brother and I die in 1815. My wife and my brother have a long legal custody battle over my son, my brother wins. This is not good for my son and he attempts suicide in 1826, devastating my brother.
Ludwig van BeethovenI am now completely deaf and I spend my final years living in isolation causing me to become withdrawn and antisocial.
NarratorLudwig van Beethoven dies of pneumonia in March 1827, highly respected in Vienna.
Narrator 2Ludwig van Beethoven was a bold innovator, highly original and an influential figure. He was a superb musical architect: he planned and revised.
Narrator 3He used explosive accents, extreme dynamic contrasts and he incorporated new instruments into the orchestra such as the piccolo and trombone.

ART is to get people talking!

Class: Grade 8                                                 Date: TBD

Topic: Social Issues                                         Subject: Music

Lesson Plan50 Minutes 
Content: Students are introduced to Igor Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring by watching a YouTube video by Ballets Russes. Students are asked to describe, analyze or interpret an arts expression they are interested in. Teacher explains how the audience interpreted Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring 107 years ago. Students are asked to create their own work using the call and response format, within a drumming circle. Students document how their response was influenced by Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring.
Outcomes and Indicators:
(Arts Ed) CR8.1 Respond to professional dance, drama, music, and visual art works through the creation of own arts expressions. Describe, analyze, and interpret arts expressions of personal interest. Analyze and discuss how dance, drama, music, visual and interdisciplinary arts are expressions of individual or collective perspectives. Create own work (e.g., visual or performing arts) in response to a professional arts expression, and describe how own work is inspired or influenced by the original work.
Assessment: Students document/ journal: A description, analyzation, or interpretation of an arts expressions of personal interest that they have found/ think of.Describe how their own work (the response on their drum within the drumming circle) was inspired by Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring.
Prerequisite Learning: Students should know how to carry and handle drums as well as know how to use their hands to drum a drum. Students should know how to follow the drumming circle conductor (teacher).    
Lesson Preparation Equipment/Materials Computer, Audio, Internet, YouTube. Access to drums for drumming circle Advanced Preparation
Presentation
Set: (4 min) This sold-out premiere ballet, The Rite of Spring, caused a turbulent uproar causing arguments and fist fights to break out during the performance!  

Development: (36 min) In 1913 (107 years ago) in France, 31-year-old Igor Stravinsky, a law school dropout, had composed a composition for the elite traveling Russian dancers known as The troupe Ballets Russes. The performance continued, as rehearsed, but so did the uproar, ending in fist fights! Display/ show/ imagine/ find an arts expression of personal interest to you. Imagine attending its formal performance and arguments erupt in the audience! Describe, analyze, and interpret your chosen arts expression in writing (assessment for teacher). Would there be reason for an uproar? To this day, no one is exactly sure why there was such a turbulent response to the ballet’s performance, The Rite of Spring, but it could be the story line, the unconventional choreography, or the dissonant and inconsistent rhythms. Create your own response within a drumming circle in a call and response format. Students respond by creating a 4-beat response to Igor Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring. Help students understand and analyze that all of our individual responses are indeed individual but also contribute to the collective perspective.  

Closure: (10 min) Describe how your own work is inspired or influenced by the original work.          
Classroom Management Strategies   Show YouTube video from 7:45-10:45. Show a picture of the Theatre des Champs Elysees, where the uproar occurred. This is not meant to be a lengthy research project. The students may quickly access their personal electronic devices to find but encourage students to use their imaginations. 

Extensions:

  1. Some students may become comfortable learning to be the drumming circle conductor.
  2. Students may have additional percussive instruments added to the drumming circle such as maracas, shakers, etc.
  3. Students may enjoy learning new parts within the drumming circle. 
  4. Students may want to research an arts expression that has deeper meaning to them rather than just imagining one.

Adaptive Dimension:

  1. Students may need to slow down their response in the drumming circle: a 4-beat response may be to fast to begin, give them 8 beats.

EXTRA NOTES, after having met with Denise:

  • To display art work have an art walk as a response to a piece of art. Example: I did this in Valerie Trigg’s visual art class.
  • 6-part process considering why one likes/ dislikes something. Cannot just say “I like it”, “I hate it”.

Allow for unconformity because The Rite of Spring is unsettling. How can they manipulate the drum!?

Was 8 beats constraining? Did Stravinsky feel constrained?

Claude Debussy: Prelude a l’apres-midi d’un faune

Class: Grade 8                                                 Date: TBD

Topic: Social Issues                                         Subject: Music

Lesson Plan50 Minutes 
Content: Students are introduced to modern era composer Claude Debussy by watching a performance of his Prelude a l’apres-midi d’un faune. Discussion regarding the interdisciplinary art expressions Debussy used (music with poetry) to further express and capture his feelings. We too can use art to address social justice, pulling inspiration from Debussy’s composition and Mallarme’s poem by creating our own cut poetry.
Outcomes and Indicators:
(Arts Ed) CH8.4 Examine and respond to the work of artists who incorporate more than one art form in their work (e.g., combining poetry and music). a. Examine and discuss various interdisciplinary arts expressions (i.e., using two or more disciplines in the work). b. Collaborate with others to create interdisciplinary work that addresses issues of social justice and/or other topics of interest to youth (e.g., relationships, body image, racism, sustainability).
(ELA) CR8.1 View, listen to, read, comprehend, and respond to a variety of texts that address identity (e.g., Becoming Myself), social responsibility (e.g., In Search of Justice), and efficacy (e.g., Building a Better World). View, listen to, read, and respond to a variety of visual, multimedia (including digital), oral, and print texts that address the grade-level themes and issues related to identity, social responsibility, and efficacy including those that reflect diverse personal identities, worldviews, and backgrounds (e.g., appearance, culture, socio-economic status, ability, age, gender, sexual orientation, language, career pathway). 
Assessment: Cut poetry is handed in at the end of class with 2 sentences explaining/ commenting on their poem: what it means to them and how it applies/ represents their social justice cause.
Prerequisite Learning: Students need to know and understand what social justice is and be able to choose one as their “cause”. Social justice can include: Relationshipsbody imageracismsustainability
Lesson Preparation Equipment/Materials Computer, Audio, Internet, YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y9iDOt2WbjY (first 2 minutes)Cardstock, scissors, glue, pencils, pens, markers Advanced Preparation Photocopy poem by Mallarme, one per student   Variety of books that address identity
Presentation
Set: (5 min) Debussy was inspired to compose this orchestral work based off a poem by Mallarme which is about a faun, a mythological character of the forest who is half man, half goat. He is visited by three lovely nymphs. The hazy, dreamy quality of the poem is captured in Debussy’s sensuous music. Let’s listen! Introduce students to Debussy’s composition Prelude a l’apres-midi d’un faune.

Development: (35 min) One student reads soliloquy (included, I wrote). Discuss Mallarme’s first response to Debussy using his poem to be set to music. Mallarme was not happy at all. His friend Paul Valery stated: “He believed that his own music was sufficient, and that even with the best intentions in the world, it was a veritable crime as far as poetry was concerned to juxtapose poetry and music, even if it were the finest music there is.” Debussy was not deterred and invited Mallarme to the premiere performance of Prelude a l’apres-midi d’un faune. Mallarme had a change of heart and said: “I have just come out of the concert, deeply moved: what a marvel! …Listen to the composition for yourself!” Music and poetry have been combined because Debussy saw the desires and dreams of the faun moving in a warm afternoon and he wanted to create a similar atmosphere musically. We can create interdisciplinary work that addresses issues of all kinds. Today we will focus on social justice. Display books that address identity, encourage students to choose a social justice topic that is important to them and have them create cut poetry in partners from the poem by Mallarme. They may add words of their own to assist in the creative process. The students can choose to make their cut poetry visually appealing using markers, etc.  

Closure: (10 min) Students can read their created cut poetry aloud. Give them a few minutes to write on the back of their cut poetry what it means to them and how it applies/ represents their social justice choice.
Classroom Management Strategies   Hand out the poem; one per student.    Look for a student volunteer with strong reading skills.         Students may not know what veritable means: true/ accurate.           Debate! Can we combine different art forms? Use one art form to respond to another art form.           Students do not have to share their cut poetry vocally in front of the class but are encouraged to.

Extensions:

  1. Students may choose to write a song with or without lyrics to represent their social justice cause.
  2. Students may work in larger groups to create longer poetic stanzas, possibly becoming a song.
  3. Students may enjoy explore using classroom instruments to assist in creating their cut poetry. 

Adaptive Dimension:

  1. Students may prefer to draw/ colour their “cut” poetry instead of using the words to express themselves.

Soliloquy:

My name is Claude Debussy and I was born in Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France in 1862 (158 years ago). My father was a china shop owner while my mother was a seamstress. I began piano lessons at the age of 7. When I was 10 years-old I entered the Paris Conservatoire aspiring to be a pianist but my interest soon changed to composition. I received many awards.

I worked as a pianist, collaborative artist, and conductor. Although I gained fame and notoriety, I had a very turbulent romantic life being involved in scandalous romantic relationships. I married my first wife Rosalie Texier in 1899. Rosalie threatened to kill herself if I didn’t marry her. I ended up having an affair with Emma Bardac (Rosalie attempted suicide at this point) and we had a baby girl together before I divorced Rosalie and finally married Emma.

I am highly original and innovative and I am influential in both France and internationally. Impressionist painters influenced my music. I am more interested in evoking rather than narrating and suggesting rather than depicting. I am drawn to mythological subjects that are often witty and satirical. I died of cancer March 25, 1918.

Poem, L’apres-midi d’un faune by Stephane Mallarne

I would immortalize these nymphs: so bright
Their sunlit coloring, so airy light,
It floats like drowsing down. Loved I a dream?
My doubts, born of oblivious darkness, seem
A subtle tracery of branches grown
The tree’s true self—proving that I have known
No triumph, but the shadow of a rose.